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A Glimpse into Women’s Shopping: 7 Lessons to Learn

Griszka NiewiadomskiLike millennials, female shoppers are a valuable segment to retailers. How can brands earn their loyalty? 

 

Though generalizations can be perilous––particularly those concerning gender––it’s safe to say that a peek into a woman’s shopping cart can provide an informative glimpse into who she is and what she’s influenced by. The insight extends beyond the individual herself. What a woman purchases can also provide clues about the people in her life, such as her family, children and professional colleagues. Here are seven things to be learned from a woman’s shopping journey.

 

1. Loyalty is a two-way street. Loyalty programs and incentives give customers a reason to return while also helping the retailer better understand and tailor experiences to specific shopper preferences. Social media also plays a role. Tesco, for instance, increased its presence on Twitter to invite one-on-one interactions, which include dialogue with customers about product questions, issues, challenges and requests. This personalized communication has helped the brand overcome the perception that it’s just another faceless retailer.

 

2. A little treat is a nice surprise. According to an analysis by Baymard Institute, the average rate of shopping cart abandonment is 68.6 percent. The primary reason? Unexpected costs. Email reminders to “check your cart” give customers a nudge, but a more effective approach is to offer something that helps make up for the costs that caused purchase hesitation in the first place––think free samples, or a small percentage off the order total with a deadline.

 

3. Optimize mobile. A study by Forbes suggests that nearly nine in 10 smartphone shoppers reported a negative experience with mobile shopping. The biggest problems are difficulty navigating, inconvenient checkout, multiple steps to purchase and buttons that aren’t user-friendly. Some retailers, such as Nordstrom, have addressed these issues by implementing “one-click” purchasing in their mobile apps. Additionally, the primary functionalities are made prominent and clear.

 

4. Saying “thank you” goes a long way. A survey by CreditCards.com reports that three out of four adults tends to make impulse purchases, with women being more likely (52 percent of women versus 46 percent of men). Tongue-in-cheek post-purchase messaging might help alleviate the “fear” of an impulse purchase, such as a direct statement that references a promise safeguarding against buyer’s remorse. Giving a purchase attention, such as a dedicated “thank you” email follow-up, might also reassure customers that they made a good decision.

 

5. It’s not just about her. Not only do women influence the majority of purchases in a household, they execute most of the purchases themselves. They buy for husbands, children, colleagues and friends, from birthday presents to baby shower gifts. So, not all messaging should be targeted at the female customer herself. Product suggestions should keep in mind the breadth of who a woman buys for.

 

6. Eliminate product-search frustration. According to a study by Aisle411, approximately 13 percent of customers leave a store without the item they were looking for. Employees need to ask every customer if they found what they were shopping for, and it can’t just be lip service. If the customer searched in vain, a system should be in place to record requested inventory and alert customers when it arrives.

 

7. Leave them with a small surprise. A good customer experience is worth its weight in gold. For a woman with a busy life––family, kids, career, etc.––shopping isn’t always enjoyable; in fact, sometimes it’s just another item on the to-do list. It’s the retailer’s job to make shopping fun (or at least, pleasant), and a little something extra can do the trick. It doesn’t have to be a huge undertaking––think small gestures like free samples at the store or a nice note during online checkout.